J.H. Bennett Featured on Manufacturing Revival Radio

Posted by Alex Rourke on Mon, Jul 01, 2013 @ 08:02 AM

Manufacturing Revival RadioLast week, our company's president, Ray Blashill, was featured on Manufacturing Revival Radio, a radio show dedicated to showing how manufacturing is making a comeback by highlighting the innovative industry trends and leaders.

Here's a list of some of the show's highlights:

  1. Ray shares his background and the path that led him to J.H. Bennett & Company.
  2. We get a 10,000 ft view of J.H. Bennett & Company
  3. How does being employee owned have a positive effect for the customers of J.H. Bennett & Company?
  4. What customers does J.H. Bennett & Company serve? How has the customer base evolved over time?
  5. What types of manufacturing takes place in Life Sciences versus Automotive?
  6. Do the skill sets from transfer from one industry to another?
  7. What does J.H. Bennett & Company look for in a manufacturer?
  8. Ray provides his thoughts on the future on American Manufacturing

To listen to the interview, use the player at the top of this blog post. Additionally, you can download the show on iTunes and listen to it on the go.

J.H. Bennett is proud to be featured as part of manufacturing's comeback in America!

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, industrial, jobs

Using Three-Way Valves with Double-Acting Cylinders

Posted by Alex Rourke on Thu, Jan 17, 2013 @ 02:40 PM

This article is part of our Product Information Series: An effort by J. H. Bennett to keep you up to date on the latest offerings from our suppliers. The content of this article was taken from a blog post on Humphrey's website. Click here to learn more about the manufacturers we represent.

R014C webDid you know that three-way valves offer alternatives and benefits for control of double acting cylinders versus the conventional reaction to use a four-way valve. Four-way valves are essentially two three-way valves in a common body. Separating the three-way valves into individual valves can offer other options/benefits.

Here are some examples:

  • The three-way valve is often smaller and lighter than a four-way valve, permitting mounting of three-way valves closer to or on the double- acting cylinder. This shortens the air lines which reduces air consumption and provides faster response; potentially permitting the use of even smaller, less expensive three way valves.
  • One three-way valve may be all that is needed if the cylinder is mounted vertically, permitting gravity or load to extend or retract the double-acting cylinder, while the three-way valve powers the other end of the cylinder.
  • One three-way valve can be used in a similar way if the cylinder is extended/retracted by low pressure air via a regulator (see "How Super Quick Exhaust Valves are used to enhance the performance of air cylinders" in Catalog HKV-7 page 90). This method also provides greater reliability/cycle life as mechanical spring return cylinders have a shorter life due to spring fatigue and/or failure.
  • One three-way valve of a certain actuator (Manual/Mechanical or Solenoid) may be used to control one end of the double acting cylinder while piloting another three-way pilot valve at the other end of the cylinder. For example if you needed a four way equivalent of the 125V, you could use a 125V to control the normally closed function/side of double-acting cylinder and a 125A Normally Open to control the other side of the double-acting cylinder. When the 125V is actuated it fills one end of the cylinder, while pilot actuating the 125A to cause it to exhaust the other end of the cylinder. In this case the 125V can be located near the operator position and the 125A could be mounted on the cylinder for easy mounting by the plumbing. This also gives some of the benefit of example one.

At J.H. Bennett, we're committed to helping you find useful solutions like this to make your business more efficient. Looking for a more complete solution? J.H. Bennett's technical engineering team can put a custom package together that suits all your needs. For more information, Contact our customer service department today. We'll be glad to answer any questions you may have.


Learn more about the products we offer from:

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About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, Technical/Engineering Team, Custom Systems, industrial, manufacturing, humphrey, Product Information

Parker Adds Industry-Leading Hydrogen Sensing Systems to its Instrumentation Offerings

Posted by Alex Rourke on Wed, Jan 16, 2013 @ 01:41 PM

This article is part of our Product Information Series: An effort by J. H. Bennett to keep you up to date on the latest offerings from our suppliers. The content of this article was taken from a press release by Parker Hannifin. Click here to learn more about the manufacturers we represent.

ParkerPartnershipHUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA – The Instrumentation Products Division (IPD) of Parker Hannifin Corporation, the global leader in motion and control technologies, has signed an agreement with California-based H2scan Corporation to become the exclusive manufacturer of co-branded process systems incorporating over 11 different process monitors. The monitors will be integrated into a larger, co-branded sensing solution targeted at refineries, petrochemical, fertilizer, ammonia and hydrogen production plants.

Parker IPD will be responsible for the final testing, field calibration, and direct-to-customer delivery. Additionally, Parker will non-exclusively private label and internationally offer H2scan’s line of area safety products targeted at battery room, refineries, hydrogen storage and nuclear applications.

“Dating back to our earlier work integrating H2scan’s miniaturized process analyzers with our modular IntraFlow™ NeSSI™ platform for a large British Petroleum project, we realized the excellent fit between our companies’ products and services. This agreement is a natural next step for Parker and the beginning of a long-standing relationship we expect to have with H2scan,” said Craig Beckwith, General Manager of Parker’s Instrumentation Products Division.

Parker IntraFlow surface-mounting fittings dramatically reduce the amount of space required for instrumentation flow control systems by as much as 75%, minimizing the volume of sample flow paths, speeding construction and reducing cost of ownership.

Based on a patented "chip on a flex" technology, H2scan’s hydrogen sensing system monitors are able to detect and measure hydrogen without false readings or expensive support equipment. This makes them ideal for the NeSSI™ platform. H2scan’s process systems have the ability to operate in real time, with or without the presence of oxygen, and without interference from high concentrations of CO or H2S, separating H2scan from all other in-line measuring technologies. The area leak detector sensing systems are able to detect hydrogen in air from 2,000 ppm to 5% concentration without cross-sensitivities to other gases.

“Signing a global manufacturing agreement with Parker is crucial to our business today, as increased sales are driving us to expand production, testing and fulfillment around the world,” explained Dennis Reid, President and CEO of H2scan. “We see our endeavors as a monumental step for H2scan,” Reid added.

Parker production of exclusively co-branded process systems incorporating H2scan process models has already begun, and the first systems have already been built and shipped to petroleum companies.  

For more information regarding Parker’s co-branded sensing solution, contact Parker IPD at 256-881-2040 or Mike Nofal at 661-775-9575, ext. 618.

The Instrumentation Products Division is dedicated to being the global leader in the design, manufacture and distribution of high quality, critical flow and ultra-high purity components for the petrochemical, chemical processing, oil and gas, power generation, water analysis, biopharmaceutical, semiconductor, and analytical equipment industries.

H2scan was founded in 2002 and has its headquarters, sales, production, and marketing staff in Valencia, California. The Company provides the most accurate, tolerant, and affordable hydrogen leak detection and process gas monitoring solutions for industrial markets, enabling accurate monitoring and control functions for a wide range of applications, including control systems, safety monitoring and alarm systems. H2scan also provides portable, hand-held configurations for easy leak detection and monitoring.

With annual sales exceeding $13 billion in fiscal year 2012, Parker Hannifin is the world's leading diversified manufacturer of motion and control technologies and systems, providing precision-engineered solutions for a wide variety of mobile, industrial and aerospace markets. The company employs approximately 60,000 people in 48 countries around the world. Parker has increased its annual dividends paid to shareholders for 56 consecutive fiscal years, among the top five longest-running dividend-increase records in the S&P 500 index. For more information, visit the company's web site at www.parker.com, or its investor information web site at  www.phstock.com.

At J.H. Bennett, we can offer you this product and many others from our over 50 manufacturers of electrical, hydrualic, and pneumatic equipment. Looking for a more complete solution? J.H. Bennett's technical engineering team can put a custom package together that suits all your needs. For more information, Contact our customer service department today. We'll be glad to answer any questions you may have.


Learn more about the products we offer from:

parker logosmall

 

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, Technical/Engineering Team, Custom Systems, industrial, manufacturing, Product Information, Parker

Vacuforce Traction Cups Set a High Bar

Posted by Alex Rourke on Thu, Jan 03, 2013 @ 03:13 PM

This article is part of our Product Information Series: An effort by J. H. Bennett to keep you up to date on the latest offerings from our suppliers. The content of this article was taken from an informational email sent to us by Vacuforce. Click here to learn more about the manufacturers we represent.

The Vacuforce SFB series of vacuum cups are designed to offer customers a cup that can pick up on angled surfaces and adapt to products such as formed sheet steel that has a tight radius. We've seen these cups in action and can attest to their superiority for customers looking for a vacuum cup made for steel stamping, check out this video to see what we mean:

The cups include an aluminum male or female threaded fitting for machinery and vacuum source connection.

This cup is available as standard in polyurethane which is a mark free compound, as flexible as rubber but much harder wearing. Ideal for handling pressed steel sheet and glass products. Standard Durometer is 60. Other Durometer grades are available upon request.

The single bellows design offers slight vertical movement when vacuum is applied independent of the machinery aiding sheet separation and also compliance on concave and convex surfaces.

Not only are these cups avaliable at a competitve price, but they offer a level of durability that is unmatched by many of Vacuforce's competitors. This makes for a dynamic and veristle package that can help save your business money while providing it greater flexibility.

J.H. Bennett can provide you with a complete vacuum solution for any of your needs. Additionally, Our Technical Engineering Team can offer completely custom solutions for more complex applications.

For more information on this and other products we offer, Contact our customer service department today. We'll be glad to answer any questions you may have.


Learn more about the products we offer from:

Vacuforce

 

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: Technical/Engineering Team, manufacturing, Product Information, vacuum, Vacuforce

Molded Connectors: The Smart and Effective Solution

Posted by Alex Rourke on Wed, Dec 12, 2012 @ 02:17 PM

This article is part of our Product Information Series: An effort by J. H. Bennett to keep you up to date on the latest offerings from our suppliers. The content of this article was taken from an informational email sent to us by by Canfield Connector. Click here to learn more about the manufacturers we represent.

Canfield Connector Molded Solenoid Connector Field-wiring and assembling solenoid valve connectors can be a time-consuming and tedious process. On top of that, field-wired connectors can wear out over time and cause problems down the road when valves face operational issues due to connector degradation.

To solve this problem, Canfield Connector created the 5F and 5J molded connectors. This all-molded DIN connector/gasket/cord assembly design allows for simple, fast installation and perhaps most astonishingly, makes the connector virtually indestructible.

Made from rugged yet flexible polyurethane, the connector housing boasts high durability factors and application versatility. The low profile “straight-line” interface/cord configuration allows for installation in many limited space applications. The integrated gasket design boasts an IP67/NEMA 6 rating and makes it impossible to lose the gasket. The 5F and 5J are the only molded valve connectors in the industry that feature a HARD USAGE cord as a standard option in any length required, bi-directional indicator lights, and load suppression (not intended for UL 1449). UL and CSA versions are available as well. Canfield offers any version of the 5F connector with special wires including high flex, media compatible wire, special use wire, high temperature wire on request.

This video does a great job showing just how beneficial Canfield Connector's 5F and 5J connectors can be:

Let J.H. Bennett's experienced and knowledgeable sales staff help you integrate these connectors in to your valve assemblies. Much like these connectors, our team can be both a reliable and a cost effective solution for your business. Contact our customer service department today to find out more information.


Learn more about the products we offer from:

Canfield Connector

 

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, industrial, manufacturing, Product Information, Canfield, connector

Michigan, Manufacturing, and the Fiscal Cliff

Posted by Alex Rourke on Mon, Dec 10, 2012 @ 12:15 PM

Despite Its Recovery, U.S. Manufacturing Faces Grave Prospects If America Jumps over the Fiscal Cliff

This article is an editorial piece: The opinions expressed within it represent the views of the author and do not necessarily characterize those of J. H. Bennett. If you have any issues with this article, contact Alex directly.

Despite pressure from all sides, The U.S. Congress seems more divided than ever on the issues surrounding the fiscal cliff. The focal point of this debate - taxes - has become an area where neither Democrats nor Republicans are willing to compromise. Yet, unlike many of the trivial issues that echo around the halls of the America's capital building, this one stands to have real, palatable effects for every American citizen and business. So much of an impact, in fact, that it's effects will likely reverberate around the world.

Fiscal Cliff

Many Americans worry what a $2,200 tax increase could do to their budgets. The real fear, however, should be of the broader implications of the fiscal cliff on the U.S. economy. (Source)

Both parties have starkly different views on who should be taxed what and both have used it as their rallying cry to gain public support. However, what both parties seem to be ignoring is the inevitability that exists if they cannot come to a compromise - another recession. While many were hopeful this grave consequence of partisan politics would be enough to get both sides to work together on America's looming budget crisis, politics have, one again, taken precedence above all else.

While the effects the fiscal cliff could have on the economy as a whole are fairly clear, many wonder how this will effect manufacturing in particular. American manufacturing faces more threats than other industries. These threats are all different and yet all contribute to the bleak future manufacturing faces if another recession occurs. For one, technological innovation takes more manufacturing jobs that it does in other industries. In a recession, while capital investment may not be the most savory option for many companies, the cost savings involved with industrial automation make it an effective option (though it comes at a long term cost). More threatening than this, though, is the threat of outsourcing. When companies need to slim up, a very effective way to do this is to send work overseas. In other industries, increased demand during a recovery will bring jobs back for Americans. In manufacturing, output is simply increased in overseas plants - a problem for those hoping to get their jobs back.

These factors make recessions more damaging and recovery more difficult for American manufacturers. In Michigan and other Midwestern states, this effect is amplified by the fact that nearly twice the percentage of people work in manufacturing as opposed to other industries.

Manufacturing Job Loss During Recession

Midwestern states suffered the greatest losses in manufacturing jobs during the last recession. Another one may not be as detrimental, but we should be concerned about potential job loss anyway. (Source)

The impending recession is already having a real effect on industry growth. The Institute of Supply Management reported that the purchasing manager's composite index (PMI) survey fell to 49.5 in November, down from 51.7 in the month prior. That number is 5.17% lower than what it was a year ago and the lowest its been since July 2009. More concerning is that any number below 50 indicates contraction - a circumstance that has occurred for four of the past six months.

"The fiscal cliff is the big worry right now," one survey response read. "We will not look toward any type of expansion until this is addressed; if the program that is put in place is more taxes and big spending cuts — which will push us toward recession — forget it." These concerns were echoed by all others who were surveyed - a grim indicator of future job growth in the segment.

A recession could prove especially damaging to Detroit's Big Three automakers - Ford, GM and Chrysler. All of these companies have been experiencing record growth in the past year and have been adding jobs to Michigan's economy as a result. This trend is not likely to continue if another recession occurs - an important realization when you consider that most of Michigan's 500,000 manufacturing jobs rely on these companies.

At the moment, the Big Three are still optimistic about their growth prospects but are keeping a close eye on Washington all the same. "Certainly for the short run, I absolutely don't think the fiscal cliff is going to have that much of an impact on auto sales," said Lacey Plache, chief economist for Edmunds.com. "The way people will be hit - and this will take longer to come in - is through effects in the economy in general."

GM Renaissance Center

GM is in a much better position to handle a recession now that it was in 2008, but it could put a halt to its forward momentum. (Source)

Lower consumer confidence caused by economic uncertainty could undermine increasing vehicle sales, but these effects will be offset by other factors, such as strong sales in China and their current momentum fueled by pent up consumer demand. As far as manufacturing in general goes, small and unique firms are opening their doors and producing products here in the U.S.. Additionally, some major firms are making significant investments in American manufacturing, but these gains will not be enough to offset the loss of jobs occurring elsewhere in the industry.

While these metrics do provide some hope for American manufacturing firms, they do little to overcome the biggest issue faced by U.S. manufacturing: a lack of competitive advantage. While some jobs have been added to our economy during the current recovery, we have also learned how difficult this can be to do. If a company decides to move to another country as a result of lower costs, it is  very tough to convince them to move back even if the economy is recovering once again.

When and if we enter another recession, curbing the effects of it on U.S. manufacturing is going to be difficult, if not impossible to do. The best solution would be avoid this crisis altogether, though the window for pursuing that option is closing quickly.

As always, American firms will have to remain vigilant and optimistic to weather yet another storm. The greatest fear moving forward for them should not be about this potential recession itself, but rather about why it will have occurred. This downturn could prove to be a testament to how truly broken our government is, and more significantly, the damage the politicians that comprise it are capable of doing.

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, industrial, manufacturing, miscellaneous, Detroit, Opinion, jobs

9 Reasons To Choose Humphrey's F-series Directional Control Valves

Posted by Alex Rourke on Fri, Dec 07, 2012 @ 01:16 PM

The F10, F15 and F18 Directional Control Solenoid Valves Offer Uncompromising Fit With Any Size Cylinder In Addition to Providing Other Great Benefits That Might Surprise You

This article is part of our Product Information Series: An effort by J. H. Bennett to keep you up to date on the latest offerings from our suppliers. The content of this article was taken from an informational blog post by Humphrey. Click here to learn more about the manufacturers we represent.

F Series ValvesWhile a variety of alternative solenoid directional control valves exist, Humphrey's arguably offers a greater value for customers in a useful, small package. The F10 and F15 achieve 0.28 and 0.56 Cv flow capacity in a 10mm and 15mm width. These valves are a popular choice for operating small to medium size cylinders, up to 2.5" bore. F18 Series control valves achieve 1.0 Cv flow capacity in an 18mm width. These are popular for operating medium-size cylinders, up to 4" bore.

One of the greatest features of F-series valves is the variety of options offered for them: Humphrey offers the product in multiple manifold configurations. These include monoblock, non plug-in, pre-wired plug-in and the highly desired serial transmission manifolds. Furthermore, ultra-low (0.1 Watt) current consumption solenoids and IP65 protection are also available in the F10 and F15 models. This variety of options allows for use of F-series valves in virtually all circumstances. Here's 9 reasons we think Humphrey's F-Series valves are the best choice for your directional control valve needs.

Designed With a Focus on Usability

Humphrey's claim that F-series valves are designed with usability in mind is certainly prevalent when focusing on the unique features offered by these products:

  1. Single or double dual-use valves: F-series 2 position valves allow for use of single or double solenoid valve function
  2. Employs dual-use different size fittings: Dual-use different sized fittings can be connected to two different types of tubes with differing diameters
  3. Allows the fitting block to be changed for either base piping or direct piping: This gives users the freedom to change piping direction without aquiring a new valve

Using It Is Now Easier Than Ever

The F10 and F15 series valves have been redesigned so they are easier to use for a variety of reasons:

  1. More Compact, lower power consumption
  2. Tandem 3-port valve has been newly added
  3. Wire-saving configurations have been added to monoblock manifold
  4. Optional stop valve has been added
  5. Optional back pressure prevention valve has been added
  6. Slim and compact

Its only fitting to match valves this great with a distributor who's just as good. At J.H. Bennett, we can offer you great prices on Humphrey Products in addition to custom solution services and unmatched customer support. Want to learn more about these valves? Click here to download the F-series information Sheet, which discusses each of the 9 points above in great detail. Then, if you have any more questions or concerns, contact us - we're glad to help.


Learn more about the products we offer from:

HP2012 logo

 

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, Technical/Engineering Team, Custom Systems, humphrey, Product Information, F-series

High Torque Testing Made Easy With Spinning Actuators

Posted by Alex Rourke on Thu, Nov 29, 2012 @ 02:30 PM

Rotating Actuators Provide the Opportunity to Stress High RPM Components Without Having to Use The Actual Motor and Instead Use A Smaller Electric Motor

This article is part of our Product Information Series: An effort by J. H. Bennett to keep you up to date on the latest offerings from our suppliers. The content of this article was taken from an informational email sent to us by Micromatic. Click here to learn more about the manufacturers we represent.

RotatingActuatorSketchThe Rotating actuator is a new innovation of reciprocating torque actuators. Its interior design and construction are similar to standard lines of stationary actuators, but the Rotating actuator, unlike the stationary models, revolves in application. Also, its applications are entirely different.

It consists of an aluminum alloy body with a precision machined cylindrical chamber, a central splinedend shaft on which vanes are fixed, and barriers or shoes that provide positive internal stops for the vanes. The number of vanes and shoes within the unit limit the arc of vane travel and effect the torque output capacities.

Power is derived from either hydraulic or pneumatic pressure directed against the vanes which, in turn, rotate the splined shaft. Although the shoes limit the movement of the vanes to a precise maximum degree, any required arc of movement can be controlled by valves and external positive stops. Infinitely variable, increasing and decreasing, and sudden loads can be applied.

Reciprocating torque actuators, like most power outputs, are usually mounted to a stationary base. But the Rotating actuator revolves in application as an integral part of a functioning device: the body, vanes, and shaft rotate in unison, maintaining their relationship until fluid pressure changes the position of the vanes.

Applications

DRAWING A. Centrifugal, bending, and torque testing of couplings, fatigue specimens, and universal joints is done in this typical arrangement. The Rotating Rotac actuator supplies the torque load, stress, or shock the items.

FiguresAB

DRAWING B. Two automotive differentials are tested in this arrangement. The Rotating Rotac actuator’s reciprocal capabilities impose continuous forward, reverse and variable action plus shock loading on the specimens.

DRAWING C. In chucking lathe applications, the Rotating Rotac actuator actuates the jaws of the chuck, and shifts the locations of the work for eccentric turning during the machining cycle.

FiguresCD

DRAWING D. In a gear testing arrangement, an electric motor drives the entire assembly, including the Rotating Rotac actuator. Hydraulic power input to the Rotac actuator imposes load or shock to the gear train.

It Works Like This:

In applications such as machining, the Rotating actuator is mounted to the spindle and rotates at the same speed. When fluid pressure is applied, it either advances or reverses the relative position of the vanes — therefore the shaft — to supply the necessary movement, or torque, as the job requires. In test and fatigue applications, the Rotating actuator is mounted remote of the power source but as an integral unit of entire driving assembly. Its function is to impose torque circulating within the driven assembly but independent of the rotating power source. Controlled fluid pressure on the vanes within the actuator apply load, or shock as the test may require, on the driven specimens.

In applications and illustrations shown in this blog post, the Rotating actuator is equipped with a hydraulic union for pressure input. Similar devices can be used to accommodate pneumatic pressure.

RotacRotating actuators are designed in “small” and “medium” models with two and three vanes to provide torque outputs for many applications. To view more drawings, specifications lists, and charts to help you pinpoint the exact model to suit a given purpose, download Micromatic's Spinning Actuator Fact-sheet. In addition to this information, engineering service is available through J. H. Bennett, contact us for more information.


Learn more about the products we offer from:Micromatic


About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, Technical/Engineering Team, industrial, Product Information, Micromatic

Detroit Dichotomy: Prospering Business and a Failing Government

Posted by Alex Rourke on Wed, Nov 28, 2012 @ 08:54 AM

Recent Data Shows That the Motor City is Surging Back To Life and Yet It's Government Is On the Verge Of Bankruptcy

This article is an editorial piece: The opinions expressed within it represent the views of the author and do not necessarily characterize those of J. H. Bennett. If you have any issues with this article, contact Alex directly.

Looking at the city of Detroit's current financial situation, one would guess that the city is not any better now than it was during the recession. The government is on the verge of bankruptcy, unable to come up with the money to pay for basic city services or to secure a loan from the state government. With abandoned land totaling roughly 40 square miles - an area the size of Paris, France - the city is finding it extremely difficult and costly to provide utilities, fire and police protection, and other public services to those spread across this vast area of land. Adding to the city's financial calamities are the numerous corruption cases that have plagued the city's reputation for years now.

The impending fate of the city's government, however, does little to reflect the economic situation of its citizens and businesses. A recent study by CareerBuilder and EMSI lists Detroit as the 4th fastest growing Metropolitan area in the country between 2010 and 2012. Some people are actually moving back to the city - primarily young professionals poised to fuel Detroit's growth in the years to come. New and unique businesses are making their home in Detroit, inspired by its potential.

Books are even being written about Detroit's comeback: Author Mark Binelli's book Detroit City Is the Place To Be highlights how the city's precarious circumstances means that it has opportunities that exceed many peoples' expectations. In a recent interview on Michigan Radio, Binelli characterized a growing culture of optimism surrounding the once decaying city, "There is a do-it-yourself possibility in Detroit. There is lots of stuff happening on a micro level that is very exciting."

Even domestic automobile companies - an industry at the heart of Detroit - which were once known for their near collapse are now being noticed for something different. GM and Ford both appeared in Fortune Magazine's list of the top 20 most profitable companies in the US. All three of Detroit's automakers are experiencing better sales than they have since before 2001 - reclaiming their positions as the largest auto makers in the world.

Chrysler Headquarters Building

Earlier this month, Chrysler announced it is adding 1,250 new jobs to 3 Detroit area plants. It will take more than small additions like this to revive Detroit, however. (Source)

This begs the important question, where is the disconnect? Why is the city itself doing so poorly despite its recent economic success?

The answer lies in a variety of factors: Poor management on the part of city officials, costly contracts, union overreach, dysfunctional politics, and overextended public utilities all play in to the crisis. While the city's metropolitan area may be growing, the city itself is not. The stigma surrounding Detroit still remains and is largely true - the education system is failing and crime is indeed a tremendous issue. These issues, among others are keeping people (and their potential tax revenue) out of the city and are instead pushing them in to the lucrative and, in many cases, prosperous suburbs. They city's looming bankruptcy strikes an odd parallel to that of the now prospering GM.

Perhaps most startling is the fact that Detroit's issues are self-reinforcing. The city cannot generate enough tax revenue to properly fund its public services. Yet, without proper funding, these lacking services only perpetuate the stigmas holding the city back: one that makes potential tax payers hesitant to move back to the city. This vicious cycle is proving difficult to overcome, especially when the sheer mass of Detroit's issues are accounted for.

But the eerie parallel between Detroit and GM may prove hopeful for the city. GM was in similar circumstances and yet was able to overcome them. In addition to this, Businesses are a necessity for a Detroit recovery and, given their current success, could also prove to be a catalyst to it.

Detroit has a future, to be certain. It is how that future plays out that inspires the most interesting discussions. The growing success of Detroit businesses may have enough momentum to propel the city out of its current dilemma - but that's a tall order for anyone.

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, industrial, manufacturing, Detroit, Opinion, jobs

The Astonishing Truth About Pneumatic Inefficiency

Posted by Alex Rourke on Tue, Nov 20, 2012 @ 02:15 PM

Air Compression System Inefficiency Could Be Responsible For Half Of Your Electric Bill: Identifying and Fixing This Costly Problem

Sullair of Houston Compressed Air System

When dealing with compressed air, efficiency is key. Despite this, engineers make the same common mistakes time and time again. (Source)

Air compression systems are often times thought of as the "fourth utility" at many industrial manufacturing facilities. Almost every industrial manufacturing facility, regardless of size, use these systems for a variety of purposes. From powering pneumatic tools to driving conveyors, air compression systems offer critical solutions to businesses of all types - ranging in power from 5 to over 50,000 hp.

In many of these facilities, however, air compression systems are the most power intensive type of equipment used. According to the US Department of Energy, improving efficiency in these systems can reduce total electricity consumption by as much as 50%. These reductions equate to what could possibly be hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual savings for some companies.

Designing a compressed air system that is efficient from day one, then, is important to keeping costs low within an organization. Despite this, many engineers make the same mistakes time and time again when designing compressed air systems. These mistakes result in wasted time and money in addition to reduced efficiency and, as outlined above, increased energy consumption.

In a blog post on PneumaticTips.com, Author Paul Heney discusses the 7 biggest mistakes engineers make in designing compressed air systems. Avoiding these mistakes alone could make a huge difference for many firms struggling with increasing energy costs. A brief outline of these mistakes can be found below:

  1. Choosing line sizes that are too small for the desired air flow
  2. Undersizing the compressor
  3. Not managing air demand during peak periods
  4. Failure to use recovery systems
  5. Insufficient storage
  6. Not taking measures to isolate pressure fluctuations from pressure and flow sensitive need areas
  7. Improper routing

Heney goes over each of these points in much more detail in his full blog post. It's worth reading when you consider that efficient design can save millions of dollars over the lifetime of a compressed air system.

If you're interested in even further research on the matter, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's Compressed Air Sourcebook, which contains a Performance Opportunity Road Map that can be used to improve the efficiency of aging or improperly designed compressed air systems.

About the author:

Alex Rourke

Alex began working for J. H. Bennett in September 2012, he is passionate about technology and is excited to learn about industrial automation and the rest of the products and services offered by J. H. Bennett. You can find him on Google+, Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn. Please be aware these are personal social media pages: Alex's views do not necessarily represent those of J.H. Bennett.

Topics: jhbennett, Hidden Costs, Custom Systems, industrial, manufacturing, pneumatic